Visual stories

Categories

Is it necessary for me to yell so much?
27 Jan' 21

Is it necessary for me to yell so much?

 

 

 

You've been attempting to communicate your message, but it's not going through. It's driving you crazy, and you're a touch upset, so you decide to take a different approach.  

  

You scream.  

  

Now and then, concert-level volume is appropriate, such as when announcing "There's a bear behind you" or "Power line down." But the main question is: how frequently do those scenarios arise? Rarely, is the answer.  

  

Next, how often do you reach that level of intensity? "Too often," is the response. You're well aware that it doesn't function. It's never pleasant. It never improves the situation. You simply want to quit doing it. 

It's great to want something, but you'll need more to make it happen. Playing detective to find your triggers might help, as can setting realistic expectations, because beneath the yelling is tension, which isn't going away.  

  

Begin with the fundamentals.  

  

It helps to understand why we yell in the first place before we can stop.  

  

We could be in a discussion and feel as if we aren't being heard. We take it as an insult, become irritated, and the limbic system of the brain interprets it as a threat, triggering the fight-or-flight reaction. 

Our blood pressure rises, our respiration shallows, and our muscles stiffen. We can start making assumptions now that our history is included. Everything moves faster when we're high on adrenaline, and our focus narrows. "We don't think about innovative ideas as effectively when we're in survival mode," she explains. "The first order of business is to defend, flee, or fight."  

  

It's also not a one-man show. We're yelling at someone, and our attempt to exert control over the situation provokes that individual, resulting in the aforementioned emotional and physiological responses, as well as the potential for a shouting match (which is anything but festive).  

  

There's one additional aspect that's often overlooked: the element of flight. The same process occurs if we choose not to yell and instead hold our anger in tense muscles, shallow breathing, and limited focus. We're not making a lot of noise, but we're not calm or looking for ways to improve things. "It's almost as though I'm on the verge of collapsing."  

  

The idea is to create a medium ground where you can be more in tune with the other person rather than fighting or fleeing. 

 

Also Read Practicing mindfulness in everyday life might assist 

  

How will you arrive?  

  

It is possible to be calm while yelling. Deep breathing, interrupting the conversation, and/or walking away from the trigger can help break the dynamic, although it's challenging. Fear is a primal emotion, and once we're in it, our bodies become hijacked. The best path is to rehearse tactics before you need them. "You can't just rest in a hot situation."  

  

It all begins with consciousness.  

  

Over the course of a week, keep track of your conduct, recording what provoked your ranting and ranking your anger on a scale of zero to ten. Consider everything that was involved, including the people, issues, and place, as well as whether you had eaten or slept properly because self-care has an impact on your ability to handle stress. 

  

When you assign a numerical value to your anger, it becomes more objective. You can tell the difference between a 1, 4, and an 8 in the early phases and are better able to handle things. When you write down your observations, you'll notice patterns and begin to consider ways to avoid potential problems. Carrying food, avoiding particular people, or scheduling a potentially difficult interaction for when you're at your best are all examples.  

  

Deep breathing can be beneficial.  

  

There is no such thing as a magic number. People have their own ways of doing things. Simply notice your breathing, or even walk away and count to ten, according to Chronopoulos. The end outcome is the same. Your thoughts have shifted away from the stress and toward something more practical and concrete. When you're calm, another exercise is to gradually relax your muscles. You'll be able to tell when your body is relaxed and when it is tense as a result. It's referred to as "discrimination training" by Chronopoulos. You can use this information to remind yourself to do simple things like dropping your shoulders or unclench your hands.  

  

 

  

 

Comments

Write your first comment.

Leave us reply:

Related Blogs

Why am I angry for no apparent reason?
07 Nov' 21

Why am I angry for no apparent reason?

Anger is a natural reaction to stressful events, and it may also be a beneficial way to express your feelings about something that
Increase your productivity with this 2-minute mental wellness training
07 Nov' 21

Increase your productivity with this 2-minute mental wellness training

For busy professionals, these days, too much work and back-to-back meetings with no time to take breaks in between are the norms. ...
What depression looks like ?
07 Oct' 21

What depression looks like ?

Depression is a widespread ailment that affects 3.8 percent of the world's population, with 5.0 percent of adults and 5.7 percent ...
Creating a sense of calm: Practicing mindfulness in everyday life might assist.
07 Oct' 21

Creating a sense of calm: Practicing mindfulness in everyday life might assist.

It's easy to justify your lack of mindfulness by claiming that you simply don't have the time. Who has time to pause and be presen...
What comes first: Sleep, Stress, or Hormones? Perimenopause Causes Brain Fog
07 Oct' 21

What comes first: Sleep, Stress, or Hormones? Perimenopause Causes Brain Fog

When most people think of perimenopause, they think of irregular periods and hot flashes. However, some ladies may experience a di...
Ways to Relieve Stress
07 Sep' 21

Ways to Relieve Stress

Depression is a disturbing friend who often visits people of all age groups. Everyone is tied to their jobs that they fail to focu...
Your Brain's Motivation with a Dose of Dopamine
07 Sep' 21

Your Brain's Motivation with a Dose of Dopamine

Dopamine is a chemical that is naturally found in the human body. It is a neurotransmitter i.e. it transmits signals from the nerv...
Why depressed people are misinterpreted as “lazy“?
07 Aug' 21

Why depressed people are misinterpreted as “lazy“?

Being lazy is an attribute unappreciated by many. it's looked upon as a negative personality and should give people the incorrect ...
Things You Need to Know About Sleep Apnea
07 Jul' 21

Things You Need to Know About Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. If you snore loudly and feel t...
5 simple methods to combat stress
07 Jul' 21

5 simple methods to combat stress

Stress refers to your body's reaction to challenges and demands. Stress can be positive or negative and there are healthy ways to
7 simple ways to manage and reduce stress
07 Jul' 21

7 simple ways to manage and reduce stress

These days it’s hard for us not to get overwhelmed once in a while. Between juggling work, family, and other commitments, we can...
Managing Your Alcohol Intake
07 Apr' 21

Managing Your Alcohol Intake

It can be hard to keep track of how much alcohol you’re consuming. Drinking alcohol is so normalised that it can be difficult to...
Stop The Overthinking
07 Apr' 21

Stop The Overthinking

You have a few quiet moments to yourself, only to immediately start wondering if you forgot to send that email or whether you’ve...
Unmasking Depression
07 Mar' 21

Unmasking Depression

Depression is classified as a mood disorder. It may be described as feelings of sadness, loss, or anger that interfere with a pers...
We Need to Talk About Men's Mental Health
07 Mar' 21

We Need to Talk About Men's Mental Health

Men’s mental health issues can develop from different causes and triggers than those that affect women. Men are also far less li...
Flowing Through The Workday
07 Mar' 21

Flowing Through The Workday

Of course, flow isn’t guaranteed when you pick up your paintbrush, hockey stick, or flute.
Social media and Mental Health
07 Mar' 21

Social media and Mental Health

Social media use can impact our mental health, while many of us enjoy staying connected on social media, excessive use can fuel fe...
Take control of your stress with these simple stress management tips!
07 Feb' 19

Take control of your stress with these simple stress management tips!

Stress is an inevitable part of daily life in today’s super-hectic world. While a little stress can be good for you - it adds f...
Prevalence of lifestyle diseases in India: Hypertension
07 Sep' 15

Prevalence of lifestyle diseases in India: Hypertension

High blood pressure exerts a substantial burden for cardiovascular health. High blood pressure is directly associated with cardiov...