Visual stories

Categories

What is fatty liver disease and what can be done about it?
27 Jan' 21

What is fatty liver disease and what can be done about it?

 
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition characterized by abnormal fat deposition in the liver, is on the rise in the United States, affecting around 20% to 40% of the population.
 
It normally has no symptoms and is discovered by chance when an imaging test (such as an abdominal ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI) is ordered for another reason. An imaging test may be used to detect a fatty liver as part of an investigation into abnormal liver blood tests. NAFLD is linked to illnesses such as diabetes and obesity. It's also associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.
 
t's still a work in progress to fully comprehend NAFLD, including its causes, implications, and treatment choices.
 
Fatty liver disease has several aspects. 
There are a lot of medical terms associated with fatty liver disease, and it can be difficult to keep track of them all. NAFLD is a medical umbrella term for a fatty liver that is not caused by alcohol consumption. NAFLD is categorized into two categories: 
 
Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), also known as simple fatty liver or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, is a kind of liver disease caused by alcohol consumption (NASH
 
Why is it important to know what sort of fatty liver disease you have? 
It's critical to distinguish between simple fatty liver and NASH. Why? Because most persons with basic fatty liver do not experience liver-related illness, whereas those with NASH experience inflammation and harm to their liver cells.
 
This raises the chance of developing more serious illnesses such as liver fibrosis (scarring), cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Within the next year, NASH cirrhosis is likely to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Fortunately, most patients with NAFLD have basic fatty liver rather than NASH; NASH affects between 3% and 7% of the US population. 
 
A liver biopsy is required to determine whether a person has basic fatty liver or NASH. However, because of the potential (albeit rare) consequences and cost of a liver biopsy, it is not viable to do so for everyone with NAFLD. 
 
Scientists are attempting to develop non-invasive methods for determining who is more at risk for fibrosis and, as a result, who should receive treatment. Biomarkers and grading systems based on blood tests (such as the NAFLD fibrosis score and Fibrosis-4 index), as well as elastography, are all possibilities (a technology that uses soundwaves to estimate fibrosis based on the stiffness of the liver). 
 
Maintaining the health of your liver 
If you've been diagnosed with fatty liver disease, it's critical to keep your liver as healthy as possible while avoiding anything that could harm it. Here are a few things you should do right now. 
  • Don't overindulge in alcoholic beverages. It's debatable how much alcohol is too much, but it's generally best to avoid it entirely. 
  • Check to see if any of your drugs, herbs, or supplements are harmful to your health. You can use this LiverTox to double-check your list. Even acetaminophen (the generic ingredient in Tylenol and several cold medicines) can be hazardous if used in excess for an extended period of time, particularly if you have liver problems or consume a lot of alcohol. 
  • Get immunized against the hepatitis A and B viruses that affect the liver. 
  • Control any other health issues that may be affecting your liver, and consult your doctor to see if you have any underlying, treatable ailments that are contributing to your fatty liver. 
  • If you already have cirrhosis, get regular liver cancer screenings.
What about medication? 
Fatty liver disease is currently treated with no FDA-approved medicines. Vitamin E (an antioxidant) and pioglitazone are the two best medication alternatives for biopsy-proven NASH, according to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (used to treat diabetes).
 
However, these treatments will not benefit everyone, and there has been considerable concern about their safety and negative effects. If you have NASH, you should consult your doctor to see if these therapies are right for you, as they aren't for everyone. More medications are in the works, some of which have shown promise in preliminary research. 
 
The most effective fatty liver treatment is to change your lifestyle.
The good news is that the most successful treatment for fatty liver disease so far has been lifestyle changes rather than drugs. The bad news is that many people find them difficult to achieve and sustain. Here's what we've found to be helpful: 
 
Reduce your weight. Weight loss of about 5% of your body weight may be adequate to improve abnormal liver tests and reduce liver fat levels. Losing 7 to 10% of one's body weight appears to reduce the amount of inflammation and harm to liver cells, and it may even repair some of the fibrosis damage. Aim for a weekly weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds, as rapid weight loss might exacerbate inflammation and fibrosis.
 
It indicates that aerobic exercise reduces liver fat and, when done at a high intensity, may also reduce inflammation without causing weight loss. 
 
Eat healthily. According to certain research, the Mediterranean diet may help to reduce liver fat. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, substituting butter with olive or canola oil, minimizing red meat, and eating more fish and lean fowl are all part of this diet.
 
Perhaps a Cup of Coffee? Patients with NAFLD who consumed coffee (approximately two cups per day) had a lower incidence of fibrosis, according to certain studies. However, keep in mind the drawbacks of consuming caffeine on a regular basis.
 
Even though making these lifestyle changes and losing weight can be challenging, the benefits are enormous if you have a fatty liver, so give it you're all! Remember that cardiovascular disease is still the largest risk for persons with a fatty liver. Some of these lifestyle modifications will not only help you improve or treat your fatty liver, but they will also keep your heart healthy.

Comments

Write your first comment.

Leave us reply:

Related Blogs

Tuberculosis
07 Oct' 21

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a potentially fatal infectious illness affecting mostly the lungs. Tuberculosis bacteria are communicated fro...
Rheumatic Fever
07 Oct' 21

Rheumatic Fever

Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory condition that can arise from untreated strep throat or scarlet fever. An infection with the st...
Kwashiorkor
07 Oct' 21

Kwashiorkor

What is the cause of kwashiorkor? Lack of protein in the diet causes Kwashiorkor. Protein is found in every cell in your body...
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)
07 Oct' 21

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

Lupus is a disease in which the immune system of your body assaults your own tissues and organs (autoimmune disease). Lupus can in...
Measles
07 Oct' 21

Measles

Measles, often known as rubeola, is a dangerous illness that can be fatal in young children. Despite the fact that death rates hav...
Shigella
07 Oct' 21

Shigella

Shigellosis (shigelella infection) is an intestine infection caused by the shigella bacteria family. The most common symptom of sh...
Hemorrhoids
07 Oct' 21

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids, often known as piles, are bulging veins in the anus and lower rectum that resemble varicose veins. Internal hemorrhoi...
What exactly is Dengue Fever?
07 Oct' 21

What exactly is Dengue Fever?

Dengue viruses are transmitted to humans via mosquito bites from infected Aedes species (Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus). Dengu...
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, What Exactly is PCOS?
07 Oct' 21

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, What Exactly is PCOS?

Skin and hair problems are often the most visible symptoms of PCOS, and thus the cause for seeking medical help. Menstrual abnorma...
World heart day 2021: Heart Attack Symptoms, Risk and Recovery
07 Sep' 21

World heart day 2021: Heart Attack Symptoms, Risk and Recovery

When one or more regions of the heart muscle are deprived of oxygen, a heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs. When blood sup...
Rabies
07 Sep' 21

Rabies

Rabies is a lethal virus that can be avoided. If bitten or scratched by a rabid animal, it can transmit to humans and pets. Rabies...
Black fungus: All you need to know
07 Sep' 21

Black fungus: All you need to know

In the midst of the fear of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new sickness has developed as an epidemic in areas of India. Mucormycosis, of...
Deep Vein Thrombosis
07 Sep' 21

Deep Vein Thrombosis

When a cut is sealed, blood clots can save your life. When they form inside an artery or vein, they can be hazardous, even fatal. ...