Visual stories

Categories

Deep Vein Thrombosis
27 Jan' 21

Deep Vein Thrombosis

 

When a cut is sealed, blood clots can save your life. When they form inside an artery or vein, they can be hazardous, even fatal. The formation of a blood clot in a big leg vein is known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It can also happen in a vein in the arm. A pulmonary embolism or a stroke can occur as a result of deep vein thrombosis.

On its way back to the heart, blood that has traveled to the legs and feet must flow against gravity. The trip is helped by leg muscular contractions while walking or fidgeting. The contractions pinch the veins and force blood to flow through them. Inside the veins, little flaps or valves keep blood flowing in the direction of the heart.  
 
Anything that causes blood flow to slow in the arms and legs can lead to the formation of a blood clot. This can range from having an arm or leg immobilized in a cast to being confined to bed for long periods of time. Deep-vein thrombosis can also be triggered by factors that make blood more susceptible to clots, such as genetic diseases and cancer.
 
Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism symptoms. Deep vein thrombosis can strike without warning.
 
It can also result in:  
  • Pain or tenderness in a leg or arm that gets worse with time, not better
  • Swelling in one leg or arm
  • A reddish or bluish hue to the skin of one leg or arm  
  • A leg or arm that feels heated to the touch  

 The following are some of the signs and symptoms of pulmonary embolism:  

  • Breathing problems  
  • A rapid heart rate chest ache or discomfort that worsens with a strong breath or cough coughing up blood  
  • Lightheadedness or fainting that occurs suddenly
 Diagnosing pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis  
 
Your doctor will evaluate your legs for swelling and pain to determine DVT. He or she will inquire about your signs and symptoms, as well as your risk factors.  
 
Your doctor may prescribe a D-Dimer blood test or an ultrasound of your legs based on the results.  
 
D-Dimer is a substance that is measured by a blood test. When blood clots are actively developing in the body, it is virtually always abnormally high.  
 
An ultrasound of your legs is performed to check for abnormalities with blood flow in your veins. The method is known as a LENI (lower extremity non-invasive test). Your doctor will diagnose DVT if the LENI reveals indications of a blood clot.
 
It's important to note that just because the LENI is negative doesn't indicate there isn't a clot. It's possible that the full impact of the clot will not be seen for some time. Your doctor could urge you to come back in three to four days for another LENI.  
 
If your doctor fears you have a pulmonary embolism, the first thing he or she will do is rule out DVT. If you have symptoms of a pulmonary embolism and the LENI indicates one or more blood clots in your leg veins, an embolism is the most likely diagnosis.  
 
Alternatively, your doctor may request a chest computed tomography (CT) scan. A dye injection is given intravenously to examine for blood clots in the pulmonary arteries.
 
Treating Deep vein thrombosis  
 
Heparin or one of the newer oral anticoagulant medications is the first line of treatment for a DVT or pulmonary embolism. These drugs work by inhibiting the production of new blood clots and so allowing undesirable clots to shrink. "Blood thinners" is a frequent term for them.  
 
Heparin is divided into two categories. A steady intravenous infusion is the best way to provide the oldest form of heparin. Low-molecular-weight heparin is another form of heparin. Once or twice a day, it is injected under the skin.  
 
Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) and apixaban (Eliquis) are two newer anticoagulant medications that have been licensed for the initial treatment of DVT and pulmonary embolism.
 
Some people may require hospitalization to begin treatment. Many factors influence the type of heparin utilized in this circumstance. Bodyweight, kidney function, and other factors are among them.  
 
If you suffer a pulmonary embolism, you will almost certainly be admitted to the hospital. If this is the case, you will most likely be given either form of heparin at first. If your pulmonary embolism is minor, oral rivaroxaban or apixaban may be used instead of heparin.  
 
Your doctor will switch you from intravenous heparin to low-molecular-weight heparin shots under the skin to oral heparin. Warfarin has been the standard oral medication for many years (Coumadin). It was the only oral medication that could cure DVT and pulmonary embolism for decades.
 
In addition to rivaroxaban and apixaban, dabigatran (Pradaxa) and edoxaban are two more oral anti-coagulant medicines that can be administered following heparin (Savaysa). More of these medications will be approved in the near future.  
 
It takes a few days for warfarin to start working. You will cease taking heparin after a blood test confirms that warfarin is effective. You'll be on warfarin for several months, if not longer.  
 
You'll need frequent blood tests for the first few weeks while on warfarin to make sure you're getting the proper dose. Blood can be drawn every two to four weeks once your blood test results consistently show that you are taking the correct dosage of medicine.
 
Warfarin's blood-thinning activity can be influenced by certain meals, particularly green, leafy vegetables high in vitamin K. Request a list of these foods from your doctor or pharmacist. You can eat these foods indefinitely as long as you eat roughly the same quantity each day. That way, the medication's effect will be consistent.  
 
Warfarin's effectiveness in your body can be influenced by other drugs. You should inform any doctor who is prescribing you medication that you are taking warfarin.  
 
Regular blood testing is not required with the new innovative oral anti-coagulants. They're given in a set amount. Another benefit is that you won't have to worry about consuming too much vitamin K-rich food.

Comments

Write your first comment.

Leave us reply:

Related Blogs

Tuberculosis
07 Oct' 21

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a potentially fatal infectious illness affecting mostly the lungs. Tuberculosis bacteria are communicated fro...
Rheumatic Fever
07 Oct' 21

Rheumatic Fever

Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory condition that can arise from untreated strep throat or scarlet fever. An infection with the st...
Kwashiorkor
07 Oct' 21

Kwashiorkor

What is the cause of kwashiorkor? Lack of protein in the diet causes Kwashiorkor. Protein is found in every cell in your body...
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)
07 Oct' 21

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

Lupus is a disease in which the immune system of your body assaults your own tissues and organs (autoimmune disease). Lupus can in...
Measles
07 Oct' 21

Measles

Measles, often known as rubeola, is a dangerous illness that can be fatal in young children. Despite the fact that death rates hav...
Shigella
07 Oct' 21

Shigella

Shigellosis (shigelella infection) is an intestine infection caused by the shigella bacteria family. The most common symptom of sh...
Hemorrhoids
07 Oct' 21

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids, often known as piles, are bulging veins in the anus and lower rectum that resemble varicose veins. Internal hemorrhoi...
What is fatty liver disease and what can be done about it?
07 Oct' 21

What is fatty liver disease and what can be done about it?

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition characterized by abnormal fat deposition in the liver, is on the rise in th...
What exactly is Dengue Fever?
07 Oct' 21

What exactly is Dengue Fever?

Dengue viruses are transmitted to humans via mosquito bites from infected Aedes species (Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus). Dengu...
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, What Exactly is PCOS?
07 Oct' 21

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, What Exactly is PCOS?

Skin and hair problems are often the most visible symptoms of PCOS, and thus the cause for seeking medical help. Menstrual abnorma...
World heart day 2021: Heart Attack Symptoms, Risk and Recovery
07 Sep' 21

World heart day 2021: Heart Attack Symptoms, Risk and Recovery

When one or more regions of the heart muscle are deprived of oxygen, a heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs. When blood sup...
Rabies
07 Sep' 21

Rabies

Rabies is a lethal virus that can be avoided. If bitten or scratched by a rabid animal, it can transmit to humans and pets. Rabies...
Black fungus: All you need to know
07 Sep' 21

Black fungus: All you need to know

In the midst of the fear of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new sickness has developed as an epidemic in areas of India. Mucormycosis, of...